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Sound reasons not to invest in Croatia yet 
Croatia is widely heralded as a success story among transition countries in south eastern Europe. It certainly has the potential for being a successful and stabilizing force in the region. But it is arguably not one yet.  Even the most cursory look at objective data and reliable sources demonstrates where Croatia actually stands. 
The is the first contribution in a series of insightful op-ed pieces focusing on Croatia's economic outlook and investment climate.
By Joseph Molitorisz, Ph.D., Senior Fellow, Ethics and Culture, Adriatic Institute for Public Policy and Robert Moraal, Senior Fellow, Economics and Investments, Adriatic Institute for Public Policy

 

2008 International Property Rights Index (IPRI)

Croatia Ranked 70 out of 115 Countries

In Physical Property Rights (PPR), Croatia is tied with Tanzania, Algeria, Mozambique, Albania and Ukraine at the 94th Place

Adriatic Institute and Property Rights Alliance  unveiled Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia's country details found in the 2008 International Property Rights Index at a press conference on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 in Croatia at the Sheraton Zagreb Hotel. 

 Nacional, Croatia's popular political and economic news weekly prominently featured the major global study.


Entire text: Nacional
 

Property Rights Alliance (PRA) announced the release of the 2008 International Property Rights Index (IPRI), which measures 115 countries on the significance of both physical and intellectual property rights and their protection for economic well-being.  Forty-one organizations from six continents partnered with Property Rights Alliance in Washington, DC and its Hernando de Soto Fellowship program to disseminate the report.  The report's author, Satya Thallam, was PRA's 2007 Hernando de Soto Fellow.  The Index focuses on three areas: Legal and Political Environment (LP), Physical Property Rights (PPR), and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR).

The International Property Rights Index seeks to assist underperforming countries to develop robust economies through an emphasis on sound property law, creating social and economic stability and the freedom to trade in goods and ideas. The Index gives researchers, policymakers and the public around the globe a tool for comparative analysis and future research.

Link to the 2008 Report: Property Rights Alliance